Without Customer Service You Have Nothing.

Bad customer service will ruin a business faster than almost any other factor. It is easy to say you have good customer service but proving it and having a good word of mouth reputation is much harder. As a good example I see ads for auto-mechanics all the time on social media and I hear a bunch on the radio. My mechanic doesn’t advertise at all. Absolutely none and he is almost busier than he can handle. He is my only mechanic for 20 years, I send him all of my friends when they get upset about a mechanic, I send him strangers if I can help it. On top of all that I have never heard a bad word about him. Why? Quality work and good customer service. Here are some statistics to show why customer service is so important and I will be giving tips and advice for creating a customer service culture. If you need one on one help I am a phone call away (435) 554-8209 .
Customer Service - Why Customer Service Matters

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Building a Customer Service Culture

You can have good customer service by teaching your team a few skills and a short overview on problem-solving, but then you will be giving business to your competitors. There are few competitive advantages as powerful as Customer Service and few that are harder to maintain. In the world where everyone thinks that competitive advantage means lowering your price, you can stand out by providing stellar customer service. I currently don’t know any physical location in my area that does this so I know the field is open. Here is an infographic to get you started on the path to excellent Customer Service. Let me know if you need any help getting going.

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Simple Customer Service (or How to lose a customer for $0.30)

It’s a well-known statistic that a happy customer tells 9 people on average and an unhappy customer tells 16. Unfortunately, if you provide poor customer service to a marketer they are likely to turn it into a lesson for thousands. Every company I know is constantly looking for new customers but it is always cheaper to retain the ones you have. On average it is 6-7 times more expensive to get a new customer than to keep an old one. How do you keep them? Most cases it is all about the customer experience. Today is a lesson on flexibility during the customer experience.

The short version of the story is that a popular fast food chain had an advertisement on the menu board showing the price of an Italian sub. The main menu board had a different price. The manager was already at the register due to an issue with the computer freezing while taking my groups order. The discrepancy was pointed out, he said there was no difference in the sub so a member of my group ordered the cheaper version. Of course, the more expensive version was what was in the computer. No problem, punch in the discount, change the difference, reduce the price down to the advertised price right? Wrong, apparently corporate sets the prices in the computer and the manager can’t do anything about it. Let me repeat that, the manager has no control to give customers the price they are advertising on the menu board. He absolutely refused to give the reduced price. It was a matter of $0.30. Lost a loyal customer for $0.30 due to inflexibility. Not to mention the company, famous for its social media work, has ignored the post pointing it out all day. Granted, it’s a big company, but when your business is tagged in the same post as #customerservicefail, you might want to be paying attention. Now there’s a couple tweets, a blog post, two Facebook posts and a spot in an upcoming lecture. All this fuss for $.030? Well, yes, it’s my $0.30. If I spent $0.30 more on every transaction through a year when I wasn’t supposed to I would lose a couple hundred dollars. It eventually adds up so I tend to be aware when I am not paying the advertised price. Plus I feel such tactics are underhanded and it makes me feel unappreciated when a company thinks it’s ok to overcharge their customers.

 

The lesson is about flexibility. The customer doesn’t want to hear what corporate policy is. The customer doesn’t want to hear what you can’t do. Tell them what you can do, what the solution is. In simple cases like a price screw up, get them the advertised price. If it is truly against policy and there is no way you can change something, tell them what solutions you can provide, not what you can’t. Don’t hide behind policy and procedures, it’s bad customer service.

 

Arbys fixed
Of course, as we ate the manager “fixed” the problem.